Lesson in Croatian ;)

This was in my mind for a few days I couldn’t write, but I didn’t thought I would “come out” with it yet… But then I read today’s Prompt and decided… why not?

One of the reasons I love English is that most OF. IT. HAS. A. LOT. OF. SHORT. WORDS.

On the contrary to Croatian where most of it is kinda… longer.

Example A:

I want to buy new sink. The old one is rusty.

Željela bih kupiti novi umivaonik. Stari je zahrđao.

Example B:

Can you do this now?

Možeš li to napraviti sada?

You see.. Longer words. That makes rapping in Croatian a bit tricky haha 😉 But we are far from some languages like German who have really complex words and grammar.

I don’t think Croatian is easy to learn, but again no language is, unless you are a baby – they seem to pick up on these things quite fast. 😉 Croatian grammar has few advantages compared to English; we don’t have to use “a” or “the” for anything, we don’t have double letters anywhere and most important – we have only one pronunciation for one letter. A is always read as “ah” while in English sometimes is “ah” other times is “a” and sometimes is silent. E is here always “eh” and so on. So, when you learn the alphabet – that’s it. No other ways to read.

701px-Croatia_in_Europe.svg
Hi! There I am, in a shape of a flying bird. 😉

What is the harder part? Well… I’d say the grammar of our verbs is pretty complex. You have for e. “love” and you say I love, you love, they love, I have loved, I will love…. Love does not change. In Croatian it is by the order I have mentioned in the previous sentence – volim, voliš, oni vole, ja sam voljela, voljet ću… The verb itself changes.

Also you may noticed the little fella’ “š” up there. We don’t have y, q or w but we have this happy bunch; č, ć, đ, dž, š. I wish I can explain the difference between “č” and “ć”, but you just really have to hear it. We call the first one hard Č and the other soft Ć. It is the same sound, but in English there is only soft Ć – equivalent to “ch”

The same story goes with “dž” and “đ”. First one is hard, and other is soft. In English there is only “đ” and it is first part of the word jam. That’s the example I could think of. “Š” although it looks scary is just “sh”.

I have to have Croatian grammar in my pinky toe because my profession demands that. If you liked this I can make more. I promise to keep them interesting. I haven’t said anything yet about curse words – something we teach foreigners before they even know how to say hello or two letters acting as one – nj i lj.

The truth is that it is good to know a bit of Croatian because you will be understood in 6 countries (Slovenia, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia). 🙂